• Growth Challenges

    未富先老 Getting Old Before Getting Rich – China is not alone

    The notion of ‘Getting old before getting rich’ in a China context refers to the combination of incomplete industrialisation, and millions of citizens still in poverty, arising when a relatively high proportion - nearly 10% of persons – are aged over 65. The latter places them forever outside of the formal workforce, lowering the proportion of available productive formal workers while also straining the fiscal envelope. 

  • Growth Challenges

    未富先老 Getting Old Before Getting Rich – China is not alone

    The notion of ‘Getting old before getting rich’ in a China context refers to the combination of incomplete industrialisation, and millions of citizens still in poverty, arising when a relatively high proportion – nearly 10% of persons – are aged over 65. The latter places them forever outside of the formal workforce, lowering the proportion of available productive formal workers while also straining the fiscal envelope. In China’s case, the median age of the population is now 34 years old. By 2050 half of the population will be over 50, assuming a fertility rate of 1.6. An ‘ageing’ population is commonly defined by such measures as the ratio of elderly…

  • Growth Challenges,  Language and Culture

    Getting Old Before Getting Rich – The Only Way to Grey? 未富先老

    ‘Getting Old Before Getting Rich’ is a notion summarizing the combination of incomplete industrialization, and millions of citizens still in poverty, coinciding in China with a relatively high proportion – 10% of persons – being aged over 65. The latter places them forever outside of the formal workforce, lowering the proportion of available productive formal workers while also straining the fiscal envelope during the already challenging development process. Regardless of policies, this challenge indeed will press on the fiscal purse and on the limited younger hands free to take care of large numbers of elderly.   On the other hand and relatively, if China does become more innovative and is…

  • Education

    Back to School on Chinese IP

    Law schools in North America will soon be back in session, and I thought it would be a useful to do a roundup of academic programs on Chinese IP, focusing on programs for United States students.  Based on data and my own personal experience, the pipeline of talented young American law students who are interested in IP and speak Chinese remains thin, especially when compared to the rapid growth of interest in China-IP related activities. However, as this blog suggests, it is growing.