• Growth Challenges

    When China Thinks She’ll Shape The World

    A Beijing university campus and the launch Science Popularisation day was chosen as the venue and occasion by expected next President of China, Xi Jinping, to return to the public stage after a two-week absence. His public promotion of science arises in the footsteps of a speech at this month’s Russia-hosted APEC Summit in Vladivostok by outgoing Chinese President Hu Jintao highlighting China’s determination to foster innovative growth.

  • Growth Challenges

    未富先老 Getting Old Before Getting Rich – China is not alone

    The notion of ‘Getting old before getting rich’ in a China context refers to the combination of incomplete industrialisation, and millions of citizens still in poverty, arising when a relatively high proportion - nearly 10% of persons – are aged over 65. The latter places them forever outside of the formal workforce, lowering the proportion of available productive formal workers while also straining the fiscal envelope. 

  • Growth Challenges

    未富先老 Getting Old Before Getting Rich – China is not alone

    The notion of ‘Getting old before getting rich’ in a China context refers to the combination of incomplete industrialisation, and millions of citizens still in poverty, arising when a relatively high proportion – nearly 10% of persons – are aged over 65. The latter places them forever outside of the formal workforce, lowering the proportion of available productive formal workers while also straining the fiscal envelope. In China’s case, the median age of the population is now 34 years old. By 2050 half of the population will be over 50, assuming a fertility rate of 1.6. An ‘ageing’ population is commonly defined by such measures as the ratio of elderly…

  • Growth Challenges,  Language and Culture

    Getting Old Before Getting Rich – The Only Way to Grey? 未富先老

    ‘Getting Old Before Getting Rich’ is a notion summarizing the combination of incomplete industrialization, and millions of citizens still in poverty, coinciding in China with a relatively high proportion – 10% of persons – being aged over 65. The latter places them forever outside of the formal workforce, lowering the proportion of available productive formal workers while also straining the fiscal envelope during the already challenging development process. Regardless of policies, this challenge indeed will press on the fiscal purse and on the limited younger hands free to take care of large numbers of elderly.   On the other hand and relatively, if China does become more innovative and is…

  • Growth Challenges

    Superconducting technology made in China

    Nowadays, in the era of constantly growing appetite of energy and dwindling conventional resources for its generation, no one doubts that the idea of burning more coal to get more energy has to be revised and replaced by some more innovative solutions. Putting the problem of energy generation aside for a moment, it is also wise to think how to improve energy transport. Imagine how much could be saved if we were able to reduce the inevitable energy losses during the transport. We could save even more if we were able to eliminate them completely.

  • Growth Challenges

    Staffing China’s Massive Nuclear Power Program – The Challenge

    In a year when many were questioning their long term commitment to nuclear power following the accident at Fukushima Daiichi in Japan, China continues to have the world’s largest and fastest growing nuclear program.  China currently has about 12 GW of nuclear power in operation and another 26 units under construction. It expects to meet and even exceed its previous 2020 target of 40GW by the year 2015.

  • Growth Challenges

    Chinese Innovation in Electric Vehicles

    Since China entered the WTO in 2001, the automotive industry has grown exponentially.  From two million vehicles sold in 2001, against nearly 19 million in the US, sales in China grew to 18.5 million units in 2011, more than vehicle sales in the US, making China the largest automotive market in the world.  The Innovation Center for Energy and Transportation estimates that if growth continues at current rates of 10-11% per year, China could be selling 30 million vehicles annually by 2015.  Providing energy for those vehicles may prove a challenge even greater than that of providing food for the nation’s 1.6 billion residents.